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Cherimoya

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i pour a little hope in my tea

because it tastes like cream

the stillness is sweet

but loneliness

it lingers at the back of my throat

ho hum hints of bitter melon

i get lost, gazing at the garden

summer is still breathing

between ruby grape tomatoes

desperately clinging for life

on withering vines

the birds rejoice at the feeder

serenading me to breakfast

but i am only hungry for words

mellow conversations that

taste like cherimoya

i chew on my thoughts

they taste like burnt toast

and almond butter

We are incorporating fruit into our poetry at dVerse Poets Pub.

I’ll be your host. Doors open at 3 p.m. EST.

Image: pixabay.com

44 responses »

  1. Your prom moved me in unexpected ways. So many levels in those words. Best, Babsje

    Reply
  2. I love how where you took this, I think fruits can touch so many memories. Love how you blended it.

    Reply
  3. This is absolutely stunning, Mish! I especially love; “summer is still breathing between ruby grape tomatoes.”💝💝

    Reply
  4. oh this was sheer poetry! such a joy to read and re-read –
    “summer is still breathing

    between ruby grape tomatoes”

    Reply
  5. Mish,
    As a mirror to the interior, it doesn’t get better than this! Very moving in its introspection and poignancy.
    pax,
    dora

    Reply
  6. Mish, I very much enjoyed the balance of your poem, which defines bittersweet. My favorite lines:
    “i pour a little hope in my tea”
    and
    “ho hum hints of bitter melon”

    Reply
  7. I chew on my thoughts
    they taste like burnt toast
    and almond butter

    You put it right Mish! We often have this feeling when things don’t seem right. Not writer’s block but it provides for some reflections. Thanks for hosting, Ma’am!

    Hank

    Reply
  8. Beverly Crawford

    ” a little hope in our tea” … I like the sound of that! This poem is sheer delight. I enjoyed it so much.

    Reply
  9. Glenn A. Buttkus

    I almost took this perspective for my piece, but levity overtook me, and the poem went a different direction. Yours is perfection illustrating your prompt.

    Reply
  10. Wonderful poem Mish, with nice splashes of summer — a welcome read.

    Reply
  11. I love your opening line (and the almond butter that may have a chance of saving that toast).

    Reply
  12. I learned a new fruit name today and also discovered it is sometimes called ‘custard apple.’ I would love to taste it … one day in a place far away from my high desert environment! Thank you for an intriguing challenge, Mish.

    Reply
  13. Luv that last stanza
    Much💖love

    Reply
  14. Such evocative poetry. It touched many senses. Thank you for introducing me to the Cherimoya! ☺️💕

    Reply
  15. Wonderful imagery in this! The last stanza was particularly impressive.

    Reply
  16. What wonderful metaphors you have come up with in this poem. Loneliness lingering at the back of your throat… after swallowing that dash of hope!
    A really beautiful poem Mish!

    Reply
  17. The beautiful land tasty memories of sweet summer!

    Reply
  18. Stunning Mish-‘but i am only hungry for words

    mellow conversations that

    taste like cherimoya’

    Reply
  19. Loneliness lingering at the back of the throat, is such an incredible turn of phrase. The whole thing is really lovely.

    Reply
  20. You make me thirsty for more beautiful imagery, Mish.


    David

    Reply
  21. There is a longing in your poem which makes the poem suit the times well. Absence of truthfullness, and the disappointment of substitute. One’s cup of tea should be more than the cup. Though, by the end you introduce the self-criticism, aI see, as you point to the second thought. “Who am I,” lissom, “forgetting the marmelade.” Ai enjoyed the reading. There is a certain nobility to the poem.

    Reply
  22. hope tasting cream and the many tastes you presented here left me with a reflective smile, Mish. wonderfully done.

    Reply

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