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Southport

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It is our first morning in Newfoundland. We settled in late, the night before to an eclectic vacation rental in the small community of Southport. Population 40. We want to experience the true local life of the most eastern province of Canada. I open the door to see our surroundings in daylight, barely breathing the salty air on the bay, when I hear the sound of a four wheeler, kicking up gravel in it’s path. A middle-aged man stops in front our door. “Hello! How are you doing? Staying at Peggy and Viv’s are ya?” He shares stories of the land, the people and the fishing industry. He says he will never leave “the rock”, this magnificent island we’ve come to explore. He’s ventured out to bigger dreams and cities, but this is home. It’s different here. He’s already convinced me it’s better here. He offers a word of advice to us. “Don’t worry about crossing boundaries or walking across the neighbour’s properties. The worst thing that can happen is they’ll invite you in for tea.”

My eyes wander a bit to take in my surroundings. Colourful little buildings called “stages”. Rocky shorelines and fog in the distance. He tells us of a 90 year old woman visiting the area. She asked him to take her out on the ocean to see the sights and he willingly obliged. Then his voice becomes shaky with emotion. “She said to me, ‘Now I have seen heaven.'” He puts his hand on his heart. “I will never forget her face and those words”, he says. I get the same lump in my throat, feeling the sincerity in his eyes. The conversation brings me back to a place of genuine simplicity. This is why I am here.

 

fresh breeze of August

eagle basks in morning sun

feathers set aglow

 

 

 

 

It’s Haibun Monday, everyone! The theme is “morning”. Hope you can join us at dVerse Poets Pub

I am your host and the prompt is open all week.

 

51 responses »

  1. What a wonderful place to visit… Love the way you describe not only the nature, but the people and the way you don’t care about boundaries…

    Reply
    • The boundaries were a hard one to adjust to, but very refreshing. There was a party with singing, dancing and accordion music, across the road, the second night we were there. We were almost made to feel strange for not going. No invitations necessary in this small, friendly place.

      Reply
  2. Have not been there and would love to visit the place. Love the simplicity of life in these places and of course, generosity and kindness of the locals. Hope you had a good vacation!!!

    Reply
  3. I like that sentence saying the worse thing that could happen is being invited to drink tea.

    Reply
  4. I do love reading about these, for me, faraway places, Mish, and Newfoundland is as far away from the east coast of England as you can get! Southport seems really friendly and I love the thought of a bay with salty air.our haiku is sublime!

    Reply
  5. I am so jealous. I’ve always wanted to go to Newfoundland. Our house, here in Devon, has Newfoundland pine floors – there was a thriving trade route between here and Newfoundland once upon a time.

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  6. Island folks are a separate breed for sure. We have several islands in Puget Sound that are wonderful to visit–if it wasn’t for the wait in the long ferry lines.

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  7. My “feathers (are) set aglow” in the reading, Mish! This is beautiful – calls to the heart. Newfoundland is a place I yearn to visit.

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  8. What an enchanting place! A beautifully written piece!

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  9. This is a wonderful piece, Mish. Such a heartwarming story. We all are searching for our little piece of bliss in our lives that will make the rat race seem far away!

    Reply
    • I think the eye opener for me was that it easily could be that place of bliss forever, if one wanted it to be. A little too far from family for me. But for some, a dream come true.

      Reply
  10. Beverly Crawford

    Southport sounds like a Brigadoon, bucolic, friendly and peaceful. Great place to get away from it all. Thanks for taking us there!

    Reply
  11. every part of your Haibun says welcome to serenity

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  12. This is beautifully written — Newfoundland is the only Canadian province I haven’t been to yet and your description makes me want to go sooner rather than later!

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  13. I went there years ago on a culinary tour. The people are delightful and a different breed. I had a hard time with the no boundaries and was glad to leave. But the memories of the people and the salt air stayed with me. Your haiku sums it all up beautifully.

    Reply
    • Wow, that would be interesting. Just to clarify, I never really felt that socially, there were “no boundaries”, but more of a very friendly, welcoming, down to earth community. They were open to having someone cross onto their property to see the sunset on the cliffs, etc. That was my reference to boundaries.

      Reply
  14. Nice. Your idea of the country side is beautiful, and you let one be longing for that peace and earnest living absent in the turmoil of city capitalism. You know, aI believe Canadian and Norwegian nature is not that different from each other. Ai believe there is more forest in Norway, and perhaps warmer. As peoples, we should though both be refreshed by getting out.

    Reply
  15. “He’s already convinced me it’s better here.” And then the rock got even better with your next touching paragraph. Ahh, people connecting. People connecting with the land. There’s so much to rejoice about your haibun, Mish. It makes me happy and long for the northern sea. Oh, and definitely read ‘The Shipping News’ if you never have. Like your gentleman, Proulx will convince you it’s better there too.

    Reply
  16. That’s beautiful. Your haiku is really powerful. The whole thing reads like a breath of fresh air and a hymn to the simple life.

    Reply
  17. Like others, I found this such a heartwarming piece. I particularly liked how you drew me in, so I was first hearing the fisherman, then the old woman – and back to you as narrator – the haiku is an exhilarating coda.

    Reply
  18. I think we would go anywhere, in search of what we do not have? I would like to visit Southport.

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  19. Oh, brought tears to my eyes as well. Lovely!

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  20. What a charming, friendly place it seems.

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  21. One of those places you visit and then wonder years later why you ever left.

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  22. You tell a wonderful story about a marvelous encounter. Suddenly, I’m interested in Newfoundland!

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  23. After your evocative piece I imagine the rock might receive many more visitors. You conveyed the emotions you felt so powerfully.

    Reply
  24. Wow! Now I want to visit there! Population 40 started reving up my imagination immediately. It does sound like a piece of heaven😊. The haiku just brings it home. Population 40. Just love that whole idea.
    Nice work, Mish.

    Pat

    Reply

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