RSS Feed

A Daughter’s Farewell

Posted on

May 30 016

 

I set sail without you

Into seas of rebellion

Waving white flags

At pilfering pirates

On quests for

Golden hearts

There was no good-bye

It was assumed that

You were you and

I was I

 

The sea swelled and took you

And I cursed not the wind

But your timing as I was

Left pining for words

Tossed and turned

Lost and churned

Into the brine

There was no good-bye

It was assumed that

You were you and

I was I

 
Sharing this with Open Link Night at dVerse Poets Pub, in response to Abhra’s poetic prompt, “Unintended Farewells”

Advertisements

30 responses »

  1. Okay, so this poem just nails the reader to the wall! Wow and wow!

    Reply
  2. I love the refrain and most importantly, what I think and heard, is the shift of perspective, from a young daughter, to one grieving the loss of a parent ~

    A beautiful and moving share Mish and one that I can relate to ~

    Reply
  3. It was assumed that
    You were you and
    I was I
    Love that…. and then suddenly it is too late… can connect with that!

    Reply
  4. I would love to know the story behind this – it resonates with me.

    Reply
  5. Oh those things that were assumed.. And we fight and fight, and in the end it’s empty. Sad so sad.

    Reply
  6. Soulful and so true, too often.

    Reply
  7. scotthastiepoet

    Very successful. Lovely flow and rhythm to this – ‘the you and I was I’ device works brilliantly too…

    Reply
  8. The refrain is beautiful. Having a daughter, with children of her own and her professional life, this resonates with me. The photo reminds me that she is still there, this daughter of min, and I can see her moving through her life. We give birth, we nurture, and then we let go. Beautifully penned.

    Reply
  9. This really hits the gut. Hard. Congrats.

    Reply
  10. This one really pulls at the heartstrings ❤
    Beautifully penned (as always)

    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

    Reply
  11. Insightful post describing angst of unintended (and unresolved) farewell… A powerful write.

    Reply
  12. the refrain is like the continuous breaking of waves on the shore of grief. Lovely write, but so sad.

    Reply
  13. Ah, ah, I can see that I will soon be reaching that age too with my sons, so this spoke to me… and then I realised it could have a deeper, more sinister meaning… Certainly makes you stop and do a double-take and re-read.

    Reply
    • The more personal my poems are, the more cryptic they tend to be, although that is not my intention. This was written about a rocky relationship with my father followed by his passing.
      Thanks so much for dropping in, MarinaSofia! So nice to “see” you. 🙂

      Reply
  14. Love this poetic conversation, the unneeded goodbye because the souls involved knew each other well enough to understand what the other would say. There is a bitter-sweetness to the tone–farewells, even the ones are not said–take bits of heart with them. ♥

    Reply
  15. Can feel the lump, in my throat, as I finish reading, and realize, how lucky, I was, to be able to say, “good-bye” and part with my dad, on peaceful terms. Do hope, your anger has been replaced by love and understand, as time passes.

    Reply
  16. It has, therisa, thank you. I did have one hour with my dad before he died. Communication wasn’t easy but looking back I think I know what he felt and thought. I know he loved me. So glad you had peace with your dad in the end. Thanks for your comment.

    Reply
  17. My mother was lost before we had the chance to reconcile… this poignant poem really hits home with me. Really well written.

    Reply
    • Thank you, Barry. I’m so sorry. I like to believe that deep down, the ones that loved us, know we loved them too despite the differences.

      Reply
  18. hayesspencer

    This poem hits hard with me. I had a last few minutes with my father and today, I wish it could have been more.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: